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Virtual Symposium 2019 Presentations: Virtual Symposium Presentations

Virtual Symposium 2019 Presentations

Student presenters from Adult & Online Education programs were nominated by a professor and created a video presentation of their work.  Just like our in-person Symposium, presentations were evaluated by faculty judges, with student presenters eligible for awards.

Social Media: The Highs and Lows of these Communicative Applications in the Classroom

Danielle Dolphin, Campbell Online

This research focuses on social media usage in the K-12 environment. Through the discovery of positive and negative aspects of this integration, conclusions were drawn in favor of and against Social Networking Systems (SNS). Analysis of various articles and research lead to ideas about how this technology should be integrated into the educational environment, and which of these tools would be best unused. Potential benefits are discussed, however, social media presents many downfalls. A main issue with SNS, discussed in depth later in this research, is the inappropriate use of private messaging features, and their presence in the classroom.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Terrie Bethea-Hampton — Education

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The role of psychological factors in pediatric functional abdominal pain disorders

Emily Newton, CPHS, Master of Clinical Research Online

Pediatric functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPDs) are a set of common childhood disorders of brain-gut dysregulation that all include chronic pain as one of their symptoms. While psychological factors are known to be related to the etiology, maintenance, and exacerbation of pediatric FAPDs, the literature has evolved over the past two decades from a focus on anxiety and depression to a focus on the role of pain-specific cognitions, coping strategies, and parental reaction to a child’s pain. This narrative literature review summarizes literature on both child and parent psychological factors in pediatric FAPDs.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Miranda van Tilburg — Clinical Research

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Making Virtual Reality a Reality in Schools

Mary Gatti, Campbell Online

Over the years, technology has become a dominant force in schools, changing the way content is delivered and received. Both virtual and augmented reality technologies are no exception to this shift in instructional strategies. Multiple case studies of schools that have implemented these types of technologies will be presented in order to evaluate the strengths and limits that they bring to the classroom.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Terrie Bethea-Hampton — Education

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The Personality-Situationist Debate

Nahomy Chin, Campbell Online

The following work analyzes and compares two theories within personality psychology, the trait theory and situationism. Both sides of the debate are examined in regards to their influence, and possible explanation, of the human rights violations committed by the United States Army and the CIA in Abu Ghraib.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Guy Vitaglione — Psychology

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Ageism in Pedestrian and Driver Behavior

Nahomy Chin, Campbell Online

An observational and correlational study was conducted to address the interactions between drivers and pedestrians at crosswalks. The study was developed in order to examine whether the ages of pedestrians influenced or correlated with the frequency of vehicles stopping for pedestrians.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Katherine Van Allen — Psychology

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The Effects of Interpersonal Relationships on Urgency of Altruistic Behaviors

Sequoia Miller, Campbell Online

This research study investigated the relationship between the strength of interpersonal relationships in the workplace and their ability to facilitate a display of altruism in a work environment. This study involved 33 participants from a locally owned counseling agency with two locations in the Raleigh, North Carolina area. Staff member’s participation in a winter donation drive and their level of urgency measured a display of altruism as either an immediate donation (ID), delayed donation (DD), or no donation (ND). The conclusion of the study determined a positive correlation between high interpersonal relationships and a delayed donation.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Katherine Van Allen — Psychology

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