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Virtual Symposium 2018 Presentations: Academic Symposium Presentations

Academic Symposium 2018 Presentations

In addition to our Virtual Symposium presentations, some in-person presentations from the Academic Symposium were recorded for our Adult & Online Education community to view.  (View the full Academic Symposium schedule)

Sickle Cell Trait in Division I Football Player 
Nathan Ameen 

20-year-old college football player born in The Congo, Africa, was diagnosed with Sickle Cell Trait (SCT). After moving to the United States, evaluation of medical history led to laboratory testing to confirm presence of sickling trait. In SCT, the patient presents as asymptomatic until sickling event occurs which causes the change in hemoglobin shape. SCT is a complex disorder; research to increase clinician effectiveness in the acute setting should include management for acute bronchial spasm, environment related illness such as heat exhaustion or rhabdomyolysis, and splenic and renal thrombosis. 

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Sarah Christie , Exercise Science

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Prediction Model for Big South Basketball 
Madison Beane 

This study collected the major statistics from Campbell University’s basketball teams and their individual players, comparing them with the counterparts from BigSouth conference teams. Correlation and regression relationships are analyzed, some hypothesizes are tested, and a formula is formed to predict the game outcomes. We have achieved with reasonable decent probability of success prediction rate. 

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Sidong "Max" Zhang , Mathematics

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Investigation of Microbial Involvement in the Pathogenesis of Atherosclerosis
Brian Conner, Jared Fernandez, Josh Shurley, Thomas Turner, and Chris Walker

This research investigates the linkage between atherosclerosis pathogenesis and bacterial recognition which both revolve around a common mechanism of inflammation. Histological evidence correlating the presence of bacteria within atherosclerotic plaques has not yet been made. Cadaver arteries with atherosclerotic plaques were collected as samples, concurrently with controls. The samples were evaluated by staining with Hematoxylin and Eosin, Gram stain, Warthin-Starry stain, and Acid-Fast stain under light microscopy. Following histologic examination, no overt findings suggestive of bacteria were present. Despite these negative findings, infection and the accompanying immune response’s role in atherosclerosis continues to be a growing area of research.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Bonnie Brenseke and Dr. Terence Mitchell , Osteopathic Medicine

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“No Poetry After Hiroshima”: Jarrell’s “The Lost World” Framed by the Nuclear Age
Rachel Davis 

In Randall Jarrell’s poem, “The Lost World,” the child protagonist, implied to be young Jarrell, is alarmed by a fictional comic book in which a mad scientist attempts to destroy the world. This presentation argues that the poem, published in 1963 but set in 1925, is a direct response to the Cold War, and the comic in the poem is a representation of the potential for nuclear war in the 1960s. Jarrell also emphasizes how the Cold War robbed suburban children of innocence, as well as the lasting trauma and paranoia due to growing up during the nuclear age.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Gina Peterman , English

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Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment in Non-Primary care: Initial Results of A Systematic Review
Jared Fernandez 

Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment (OMT) has been researched primarily as a therapy in the primary care setting but not in non-primary care. Our goal is to provide a categorical analysis of OMT randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in non-primary care disciplines. Forty one non-primary care RCTs were identified from PubMed. OMT has frequently been compared to pharmacological interventions for treating injuries in respect to pain relief, morbidity, and healing time. The studies have mixed results but initial results indicate that the combination of both is the best way to reduce healing time and reduce symptoms or morbidity.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Grace Brannan , Osteopathic Medicine

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Communication Historiography within Training and Development Programs 
Hope Freeman 

This study uses a historiography of communication training to evaluate the status of a major North American truck manufacturer’s training and development practices and how employee socialization and workplace culture were affected. Related literature was referenced to examine trends expected to grow within the training industry. The analysis of training tools and related development practices at the truck manufacturer is used to illustrate how historical trends are fulfilled in modern training programs, as well as identify new areas of growth for the industry. The impact that those practices have on workplace culture and employee socialization are further detailed.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Dean Farmer , Communication Studies

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Unclean: Flannery O’Connor’s Depictions of PTSD in Wise Blood 
Jared Genzel 

Wise Blood by Flannery O’Connor follows the journey of protagonist and WW2 veteran Hazel Motes. While the novel was published decades before research on PTSD, Motes’ behavior throughout the novel seems to correctly align with our modern understanding of posttraumatic stress disorder. O’Connor’s anachronistically accurate depiction of a suffering veteran demonstrates the value of using fictional literature to further understand the human condition.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Sherry Truffin , English

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An Introduction to the Theory of Knots 
Logan Gray

Knot theory, in the branch of mathematics known as topology, is the mathematical study of knots. This field of research has been around for only a little over a hundred years. In this presentation the basics of knot theory will be discussed, as well as some of its application. This information was gathered from "The Knot Book: An Elementary Introduction of the Mathematical Theory of Knots" by Colin Adams.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Brittany Hansen , Mathematics

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Data Analysis of Predictors of Cognitive Functioning in an Epidemiologic Study
Monica Hammond 

This research examined the correlation and regression between several psychosocial variables based on an epidemiological study of the elderly Hispanic population in the US South West from 2012-2013. Data was collected from the National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA). The combined variables analyzed were cognitive functioning (Total MMSE score), depressive symptoms (Total CESD score), functional Independence (total IADLS), physical fitness (Body Mass Index), sleep quality (RSLPQUAL8) and etc. Some of the common claims or hypothesis were also tested.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Sidong "Max" Zhang , Mathematics

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Death Penalty: When Is the Death Penalty Cruel and Unusual? 
Casidy Havird 

This presentation will examine the death penalty and history. Next the paper will examine the 8th amendment prohibition as it relates to the death penalty. In certain cases the death penalty has been deemed to be cruel and unusual. These case factors include intelligence of offender, age of offender, type of crime committed, and method of execution. Recent supreme court opinions will be discussed. In conclusion, recommendations will be offered.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Catherine Cowling , Criminal Justice

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Stereotypes in Society and Story: Gender Roles in Joyce Carol Oates’s Bellefleur
Jordan Hobgood 

The grotesque figures and dark, mysterious settings of the American Gothic novel can disorient and distance readers who wonder what lesson could come from such an unfamiliar world. However, the differences between the Gothic and reality should not unsettle readers quite as much as their similarities. Joyce Carol Oates exemplifies this in her novel Bellefleur by depicting the familiar and infectious prevalence of restrictive gender roles in a Gothic America. This paper will present and analyze feminist criticisms of Bellefleur to demonstrate how Oates’s characters and plot challenge gender stereotypes and urge readers to reflect upon women’s struggle for power.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Sherry Truffin , English

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Sin Robed in Holiness: Gunpowder and Religious Corruption in The Revenger’s Tragedy 
Lydia Huth 

The year is 1607, and Britain has faced the death of a queen, the combination of two monarchies, and an attempted assassination that shook the foundation of Parliament. This is the world of The Revenger’s Tragedy, a revenge drama serving as both onstage catharsis and a symbolic representation of its environment. Linking imagery in The Revenger’s Tragedy directly to its religious climate sheds light on the protagonist’s murderous vengeance, revealing a biting social commentary on Jacobean Catholics and the motivations behind the Gunpowder Plot.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Donna Waldron , English

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Volumnia and Gertrude as Renaissance ‘New Mothers’  
Lydia Huth 

In a tragic canon largely devoid of mother figures, Coriolanus and Hamlet spark debate—why include Volumnia and Gertrude, the titular characters’ tragic mothers? These women fill paradoxical, challenging, imperfect roles, but Shakespeare’s text implies that such tensions are the result of society’s harsh confines and expectations for women, and not the women themselves. I will explore what Shakespeare intends from these mothers by arguing that Volumnia and Gertrude are prime examples of his realistic exploration and subtle praise of the complex Renaissance ‘new mother’ figure.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Eric Dunnum , English

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Regarding Franz Kafka in the Light of His Sufferings 
Madison Kimble 

No author can write in a vacuum divorced from his experience. Franz Kafka is the epitome of this phenomenon. The alienation found in Franz Kafka’s “The Metamorphosis” illustrates Kafka’s relationship with his father and depicts his interpretation of his Jewish heritage. Kafka’s life was plagued by inadequacy and lack of acceptance. His life, characterized by cowardice and isolation, infuses his writing. Kafka’s work depicts immense misery of the main character who is cast out from his community. The alienation that stemmed from Kafka’s relationship with his father and his religion are vital lenses through which to view “The Metamorphosis.”

Faculty Mentor: Prof. Shirley Jefferds , English

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Not Settling for Just a Soup Kitchen: Initial Steps towards Positive Deviance Communication within Campus Kitchens
Faith Klatt

This paper explores the challenges faced in developing relationships at the beginning of a community initiative in the rural south from a positive deviance perspective. We seek to answer several questions such as "How can positive deviance be discovered in the Campus Kitchens project?" and "What are possible strategies for using positive deviance?". We also explore themes such as leadership dedication, relational community and young children, language barriers, and the non-deviant soup kitchen. We offer insight for further research and action based on these themes and ways in which the Campus Kitchens project can be improved using positive deviance.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Dean Farmer , Communication Studies

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Political Themes in the Capek Brothers' "Insect Play"
Carolyn Newsome 

Karel Capek, a man with manifest political ideals, frequently displays his beliefs in his writings. One example of this imagery is found in The Insect Play, by the Brothers Capek. In the play, Karel indirectly assigns various characters multiple “isms.” Influenced by Czech nationalism and the conclusion of WWI, Karel anthropomorphizes his characters to discuss the downfalls of the society of his time. By displaying and critiquing different political affiliations in the attributes and actions of the characters, Karel Capek creatively circumvents censorship while promoting his favored ideal of socialism.

Faculty Mentor: Prof. Bert Wallace , Theatre Studies

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“El Cóndor Pasa”: How the Fine Arts Can Politically Influence the Nations 
Caleb Newton 

The fine arts are a powerful tool in shaping a nation, for when they can capture the past in all aspects, they can speak identity into that nation. A great example of this is Daniel Alomía Robles’ Peruvian work, “El cóndor pasa”. He contributed to Peruvian identity through creating this zarzuela. This presentation will highlight the importance of political literature and understanding the reality of political situations in Perú. By performing an in-depth study of the tragedies that befell the indígenas in Perú, I can prove why it is crucial to study political literature and other modes of fine art.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Rene Ibarra , Spanish

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North Carolina Vaccination Policy Reform 
Brendon Noyes, Joshua Wade, and Hannah Whitehurst 

North Carolina's current vaccination policy is inherently flawed. This presentation will go in-depth about North Carolina's current vaccination policy and various ways to improve it.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. John Mero , Political Science

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Erythema Nodosum in a Division I Collegiate Runner 
Ruth Pacheco 

21-year-old female collegiate athlete with no prior skin conditions presented with acute history of a raised bump on the anterior portion of the left lower extremity. Initial evaluation of the bump found no erythema, heat, or pain with slight edema. Kinesiology tape was placed over the raised area to try to reduce the edema and the patient was told to monitor the area. Seven days later the patient was referred to the health center after the bump became erythemic and painful with heat. The patient was eventually diagnosed with Erythema Nodosum after several trips to the health center.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Corrie Struble , Exercise Science

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Far Away Near and Dear
Diego Parra

Bajo La Misma Luna/Under the Same Moon is the story of Carlitos and his mother, Rosario, who both live in two different places miles away from each other. Rosario works illegally in the U.S to provide a better life for herself and her son. Carlitos is left behind with his grandmother in Mexico. After four years of being separated, Carlitos decides to go in search of his mother after his grandmother passes away. This presentation will explore the obstacles, abandonment, hope, the illegal activities, the importance of family, and what it is known as "The American Dream".

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Rene Ibarra , Spanish

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A Trip Down Memory Lane: A Memory Screening Program Evaluation 
Casey Pearce 

The current project is an evaluation of two memory screening events held in community-based settings in rural North Carolina in November 2017. The goals of the memory screening events are to screen and identify individuals with cognitive impairments within the community. The current program evaluation employs an inventory design and evaluates fidelity, reach, patient satisfaction, recruitment, and effectiveness. Data are gathered from a participant survey at the initial screening, screening test (Brief Alzheimer’s Screen), follow-up staff interviews, and participant follow-up survey. Results are used to evaluate objectives and modify the protocol for future screening events.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Nicole Rushing , Psychology

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The Appearance of Love: Violence, Passion, and Gender in Bellefleur 
Abigail Pore 

With the rise of sexual assaults coming to light, the relationship between traditional gender roles and violence has increasingly come under scrutiny. Joyce Carol Oates’ gothic novel Bellefleur, published in 1980, highlights this struggle for power following a married couple battling for control of the family and each other. This essay explores how the novel’s characters define love and violence through both traditional and nontraditional roles within the family. Characters of each gender manipulate in the name of love or resort to violence in order to fuel their ambition, and their loss of control leads to disaster.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Sherry Truffin , English

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Concurrent Ipsilateral Renal Cell Carcinoma and Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma in an Individual with End Stage Renal Disease
Kailey Remien and Taylor Renbarger

Gross dissection of an 85-year-old white male with a listed cause of death as end stage renal disease (ESRD), revealed two concurrent, ipsilateral, renal cell carcinomas of varying etiologies. ESRD is a growing health concern in this country, with multiple risk factors contributing to its development, and the treatments being dialysis, and ultimately transplantation. There are many associated complications, including increased risk of cancer, with renal cell carcinoma being the most prevalent. The purpose of this study was to investigate the pathogenesis of renal tumors in this individual.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Robert Terreberry , Osteopathic Medicine

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Instead of Madame, You Can Call Me Bellefleur 
Amanda Ritz 

You hit like a girl. You cry like a girl. Stereotypically, female bodies and feminine emotions are considered weak. Joyce Carol Oates questions traditional female roles in American literature by challenging the dominance of the patriarch. Often in literature, female sexuality is a weakness exploited by the patriarch. However, in Bellefleur characters with powerful female sexuality and androgynous characteristics command the Bellefleur household. Leah and Germaine Bellefleur loosen the concrete wall of gender boundaries and surpass cultural limitations imposed on women. Their strong female roles challenge socially constructed roles of women in Bellefleur and in today’s modern American households.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Sherry Truffin , English

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Nefarious Nurturing: Gothic Mothering and Wise Blood
Leah Tripp 

Mothers and monsters. Two entities that, at first glance, seem opposite to one another. But what happens when mothers become monsters? Hazel Motes, the protagonist of Flannery O’Connor’s Wise Blood, provides a glimpse into the impact of distorted motherhood. Hazel’s journey appears to be centered around starting a religion void of Christ, but closer examination suggests that his anger towards religion has as much to do with his mother’s influence as it does with God. This essay explores Motes as a matrophobic character (one who fears separation from and identification with the mother) and matrophobia in Gothic literature overall.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Sherry Truffin , English

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The FDA vs. South American Regulation; How do they Compare? 
Anna K. Turbyfill 

Americans have become dependent upon pharmaceuticals; in fact, seven of every ten citizens take at least one prescription drug. Thus, it is necessary that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) function to ensure the safety, efficacy, and security of pharmaceuticals within the United States. How do other governments, particularly those of South America, handle drug safety? How do these policies differ from those of the FDA? Throughout this presentation FDA regulations will be compared to regulations found in various South American countries.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ann Ortiz , Spanish

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A Not So Innocent Abroad: Communication Autoethnography in Germany 
Alexis Weidner 

A Not So Innocent Abroad: Communication Autoethnography in Germany is an autoethnography about a study abroad experience in Germany. I explore challenges faced entering a new culture and understanding the workplace atmosphere apart from stereotypes. I discuss social differences, gender identification, and socialization.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Dean Farmer , Communication Studies

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Stimulation of the CB1 Receptor With Synthetic and Natural Cannabinoids Induces Seizures With Varying Efficacy in Mice 
Jacob Wells 

With the emergence of recreational marijuana and synthetic cannabinoid products, interest in the toxicological effects of cannabinoids is on the rise. When injected with a variety of cannabinoids, it was found that mice experienced seizures in a dose-dependent manner and to varying degrees depending on the drug. Future experiments will test the hypothesis that seizure severity correlates with affinity for CB1 cannabinoid receptors. To clarify the mechanism, a series of antagonist reversal experiments will be done by with either a CB1 or CB2 antagonist before the cannabinoid treatment.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Christopher Breivogel , Pharmaceutical Sciences

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Integrating Assets: Positive Deviance Potential in the Campus Kitchens Project 
Caroline Wilson 

This research project explores the importance of sustainable relationships in social change efforts through the lens of the Campus Kitchen at Campbell University. I examine how and why an organization seeking to promote social change must strive to become part of the community it hopes to serve and propose ways in which the divide between volunteers and those in need can disappear when everyone involved is invited to serve on whatever level they wish. This kind of cooperation between people from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds has the potential to create an unconventional community and produce innovative ways to fight poverty.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Dean Farmer , Communication Studies

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